You are here: Home » M&A Advisors » M&A Advisor Fees for Selling a Business

M&A Advisors

M&A Advisor Fees for Selling a Business

by Basil Peters on January 21, 2013 · 44 comments

Information about M&A advisor fees for selling a business is surprisingly difficult to find.  I’m not sure why other M&A professionals are reluctant to discuss fees and even less sure it makes sense in today’s online world. This is a current summary of the fees I’m seeing in the market.

This is an updated excerpt from: Early Exits – Exit Strategies for Entrepreneurs and Angel Investors (But Maybe Not Venture Capitalists).

Since the first version of this post in 2009 there have been a few other posts on M&A fees. Some of the good ones are linked below.

I hope you’ll share your experiences on fees, or other good links, by commenting below.

Update January 2013

There are no industry surveys or databases on M&A Advisory fees. The only ways I know to get information on fees is to ask people directly, from similar posts to this one and from comments like the ones below.

Because the data is so sparse, changes in fees over time are even more difficult to determine.

As we slowly recover from the mortgage crisis and continue to work in an environment where we have the lowest cost of capital in our lifetimes, I am seeing two recent trends in M&A advisory fees:

1. An increase in success fees of 1 to 2% (of total transaction size), and

2. Much more common “minimum fees”

M&A Advisor Fees and Transaction Size

M&A Advisor and Business Broker fees increase with the size of the transaction, but not in direct proportion. Part of the reason is that the amount of work required to sell a larger business can actually be less than that to sell a smaller company. Where this becomes especially evident is at the smaller end of the transaction size range.

M&A professionals that sell businesses fall into three rough categories:

  1. At the upper end of the range there are the big investment banks and accounting firms with teams devoted to M&A.
  2. In the middle are mid-sized firms that usually include three to seven professionals, usually called M&A Advisors.
  3. At the smaller end of the transaction range, most businesses are sold by boutique, one to three person firms usually called Business Brokers.

Understanding the pricing mechanisms for M&A fees is easier if you look at it from the perspective of the professionals doing the transactions. Very large firms have offices in downtown towers with human receptionists and assistants. The mid-sized firms have smaller offices in less expensive buildings, use automated phone answering and have no assistants. The individuals in boutique firms answer their own phones.

For a transaction to make sense for the big firms with downtown offices, the total fees have to be a few million dollars. For the mid-sized firms, the minimum fee size is in the $500,000 to $1.5 million range. Smaller firms can afford to do exit transactions where the fees are only a few hundred thousand dollars.

Typically, the big firms will compete most aggressively for exit transactions above $100 million because these transactions will produce several million dollars in fees. The $20 to 75-million range is the optimum range for the mid-sized firms. Smaller transactions are usually done by specialized boutique firms. These numbers shift up or down depending on how busy the firms are.

The standard M&A Advisor fee model includes a work fee and a success fee. In some cases, it may also include a contingency or break fee.

The Lehman Formula and Ideal Fee Alignment

Some M&A firms still base their M&A fees on the Lehman formula. This formula was created by the old Wall Street firm bankrupted by the mortgage crisis. The formula was originally used for financing engagements, but somehow also came to be applied to M&A transactions.

If you think about it for a few minutes, I think it’s pretty obvious that a simple linear percentage creates much better alignment between the M&A Advisor and the Shareholders.

The ideal alignment is probably closer to the exact opposite of the Lehman formula. Ideally, the M&A firm would be paid a larger percentage of the last million than the first million. The main reason this is not more popular is the difficulty of accurately predicting the fair value of the company at the time the transaction completes (several quarters after the engagement is signed).

M&A Advisor Work Fees, Retainers or Up Front Fees

Work fees are committed to by the company at the beginning of the engagement.  Some firms will invoice monthly over the first four to twelve months. This initial fee can also be called a retainer, engagement fee or upfront fee. This covers the M&A Advisor’s direct costs during the initial stages, as well as their contribution to the preparation of the selling documents and due diligence materials.

For larger transactions, the work fees are usually $100,000 or more. For boutique firms working on a $20 to 30-million exit transaction, the work fees are usually in the $50,000 to $75,000 range. At the lower end of the transaction spectrum the work fees don’t usually go below $50,000 because no matter how small the transaction, there is still a fixed amount of early work that has to be done.

There are firms that will charge lower work fees, sometimes in the $30k to $40k range. Lower work fees are often an indication that the firm has people who are not completely busy. For that reason, lower work fees are also more common when the M&A market is not very active.

Interestingly, firms that work on transactions valued under $5 million – usually called “Business Brokers” often do not charge a work fee.

It’s very unusual for an M&A Advisor to undertake an exit transaction without a work fee. Part of the reason is that anyone involved with exits has seen a situation where, at the time of the initial engagement, the shareholders and board are enthusiastic about an exit; but by the time an offer gets to the table the shareholders have reconsidered. This can happen precisely because the M&A Advisor has done a good job, and has shown the current shareholders that the company is worth more than they thought. This alone can result in shareholders changing their minds and deciding to continue to own the company for a while longer.

The work fee is a fair way for the professionals to protect their initial investment in helping to facilitate a transaction. It is also a test of how serious the sellers are to actually sell the company.

M&A Advisor Success Fees

Success fees for selling a business in the $10 to 30-million range are typically 6 to 8% of the final value. This means that the M&A firm that successfully completes a $25-million exit transaction will usually be paid a fee at closing of about $1.5 to 2.0 million.

For transactions over $100 million, success fees are usually in the 2 to 3% range. This means that a firm executing a $100 million exit will typically receive a success fee in the $2 to 3-million range.

Where success fees become more challenging is in the smaller size transactions because the amount of work required to sell a $5-million business is not significantly less than the effort required for a $25-million exit.

Minimum Fees

In 2013, I am seeing minimum fees being charged much more often. This clause in the engagement contract specifies the smallest amount the M&A firm will be paid if a transaction is completed.

I find the psychology of minimum fees fascinating. In my experience, most advisors don’t ask themselves what they are saying to the customer.

Just think about it. If the discussions between the M&A Advisor and their prospective client have been open and realistic, why would the engagement agreement need to include a minimum?

(If you are looking at an M&A engagement agreement and this doesn’t make sense to you yet, please contact me below.)

Why Smaller Transactions Are Often More Work Than Larger Ones

Selling a $5-million company can be more difficult than selling a $25-million company. This is because the buyers for smaller companies tend to be either the junior people in the large company acquisition teams, or the CEOs and CFOs of medium-size companies. Similarly, the legal and accounting professionals tend to be less experienced. Combined, these relatively lower experience levels, and reduced availability, means that smaller transactions often require significantly more time and effort from the M&A Advisor.

Even the smaller boutique M&A firms will not usually want to undertake an exit transaction in which the selling price will be less than $ 5 million. Even at a 10% success fee, a $5 million transaction will only deliver a $500,000 success fee. This is approaching the minimum economic size that even the smaller firms can undertake.

This is why transactions below the $5 million threshold are often done by Business Brokers or individuals who have developed expertise in this area.

Because of the amount of work involved in a $5 million transaction, the success fees are usually in the 10 to 12% range.

While the amount of work required to perform exit transactions is similar whether the company is valued at $5 million or $100 million, the fees for large Investment Banks are higher due to their overhead and perceived prestige.

Other Good Posts on M&A Fees

These are some of the other good posts on M&A fees:

http://www.crossbordermanagement.com/en/guides/mergers-a-acquisitions-in-the-us/investment-bankers/investment-bankers-fees

http://www.imergeadvisors.com/ma-advisor-fees/

Please Share Your Data and Links

I’d appreciate hearing from you about your experiences with M&A Advisor fees. The only way I have been able to aggregate this information is by asking CEOs, board members, investors and M&A advisors that I meet. If you have a data point you can share, or another good link on M&A fees, please either leave a comment below or email me directly.

{ 42 comments… read them below or add one }

Basil Peters August 28, 2011 at 2:59 am

Comments from http://www.AngelBlog.net

FromTechvibes 2 years ago
Mark Groulx said on Tue, June 23, 2009 at 1:02 PM

We are in the business brokerage business and I would say your analysis was pretty good. I would say 5% is a rough number for the $5 to 20 million range and then goes down from there. Could be a little more on the low end of the range.

mhardwicke 1 year ago
In the UK a commitment fee can be anywhere between £15k-£30k and success fee’s are typically 3% of total deal value.

Andrea 1 year ago
question: when you refer to deal value you mean Enterprise value (including debt)?
advisory work done for trade buyers can contemplate a retainer or commitment fee, however when working for institutional investors (Private Equity, VC etc) this is rarer.
Sucess fees for southern european deals would be quite lower than the figures you point to. Not more than 2% of EV up to 100m. Smaller deals are harder to do, but do not usually command higher rates.
Wingedlion and 2 more liked this

Wingedlion 1 year ago
From the M/E we see the same sort of level of fees, with monthly retainers ($50-250K pm) which are then set off, subject to a successful conclusion.

Reply

Name Witheld November 17, 2011 at 3:14 pm

Hi Basil,

What happens if I own the startup company and the company interested in buying my company approaches me? Who pays the M&A consultant fees then, assuming there even IS an third-part M&A person involved?

I once helped a client write an acquisition proposal, which I’d never done before. It was all very rushed, the proposal had to be written and presented in less than a week. My client wanted to sell his company to another company who worked in the same industry, albeit in a different area of the industry in which they didn’t compete directly. This other client was just starting out into an area of the industry my client was already very established in, so this other client was possibly interest in buying out my client’s business. My client took my proposal and pitched his company directly to the other company without anyone else involved in the pitch. The deal never went through.

Also what about companies seeking M&As who have their own M&A people internally? Do these people get a percentage of the sale? From what I gather in Dragons Den’s Robert Herjavec’s book “Driven”, AT&T, the company who paid around $70 million for Herjavec’s IT security company during the dot-com boom, didn’t pay their internal M&A people any commission (at least, he doesn’t mention it).

I’ll quote at length the part of Herjavec’s book about this acquisition as it’s very interesting:

“People employed in the mergers and acquisitions (M&A) departments of giant corporations fascinate me. They’re all very bright and highly educated, socially secure and well dressed, can mix a great martini, all of that. But I have yet to meet one who has ever started, managed or sold a business … I expected AT&T’s M&A people to work out the usual cluster of ratios and assessments, perhaps questioning me on income estimates, depreciation and other items accountants toss around. Eventually, I assumed, someone would apply a mathematical formula to find my company’s market value and make me a carefully calculated offer.

But they didn’t. The price that AT&T Canada would be offering, I was informed, would be based not on its book value but on its sales revenue. “We’ll be calculating our offer as a multiple of your annual gross income,” one of the M&A team members told me.

I wasn’t sure I had heard him correctly. How can you make an offer based on a company’s revenue alone, ignoring all the other aspects of operating a business? …

It took me a while to realize the answer. The value of my company as a going concern was irrelevant to them. AT&T’s primary concern centered on the scope of our business and the degree of customer satisfaction we were producing, which they could pass along to their customers immediately by purchasing my firm. The move would vault them into a dominant market position where security was concerned, and that was their primary objective. In that light, the time it took to get their money back was not a factor. At least, that’s how it seemed to me …

I didn’t care about the details (of AT&T’s offer). They were paying me a multiple of our revenue. It didn’t matter what that multiple was; any offer based entirely on revenue would be acceptable to me …

The team from AT&T Canada submitted their offer. The price was good. In fact, it was VERY good, and I would have been thrilled to accept it. It was more money than I had ever imagined earning in my entire life.

I turned it down.

I feared that if I accepted their first offer, they might grow suspicious. I had nothing to hide, but neither did I want AT&T to believe I was anxious for them to take the company off my hands. Besides, I don’t believe in ever accepting the first offer in a negotiation, because rejecting it strengthens your bargaining position. They would raise their offer, I expected, and they did. First, they asked for a counter-offer from me, and I quoted a figure twice the size of theirs.

I neither hoped nor expected that AT&T would pay that amount, but I believe they would return with a price somewhere in between. They did, and their new offer was comfortably higher than their original one. After some feigned consideration, I agreed to accept the new price, which was substantially more than their first offer ….

In time the cheque was issued (by AT&T). Was I pleased? Of course I was, in one sense. Yet as much as I acknowledged the impact the deal would have on my family and the personal pride I took In generating a substantial personal net worth, one thought kept running through my mind as I added my signature to the deal: I WISH I HAD ENOUGH MONEY OF MY OWN TO TURN THIS OFFER DOWN”.

So, Basil, was this type of acquisition merely an example of the buying frenzy during the dotcom boom? Or do you think this type of acquisition can still happen today in a similar way today, especially with fortune 500 companies, and even more so with Fortune 100 companies?

Reply

Basil Peters November 26, 2011 at 4:14 pm

Great questions, BSBMill.

Who pays the M&A advisor depends on who the M&A advisor is working for. Often, both the buyer and the sellers have their own.

If an M&A professional is on salary, it’s not unusual that they don’t get a bonus or success fee. In other words, completing a transaction is part of their core job description. On the other hand, they might get paid for a year or more between transactions, so like a lot of things in life – it’s a trade-off.

I chucked when I read your observation about some of the people who work on the M&A teams in the big companies.

Great question at the end – and yes that type of acquisition is still happening. In fact, so far in 2011 the M&A markets have been quite buoyant – not frothy like the pre dot-com-boom, but still a very good time to be selling.

CONGRATULATIONS ON CLOSING YOUR EXIT! That sounds like a well executed negotiation. I hope you do it again.

Basil

Reply

Cost advisors October 18, 2012 at 3:28 am

It’s easier to understand the pricing mechanisms for M and A advisor fees when selling a business if you look at it from the perspective of the professionals doing the transactions.

Reply

Basil Peters November 5, 2012 at 1:37 pm

Thanks, Andrew. I agree.

Reply

Suranjan December 7, 2012 at 10:26 am

Hi Basil,

Any idea what kind of success fee range for a $10-30million exit transaction would be applicable in the Gulf countries (UAE, Qatar, Saudi) ?

Reply

Basil Peters January 9, 2013 at 8:55 am

Suranjan,

Thanks for asking.

While I don’t have direct personal experience in the Gulf countries, I would not expect to see a significant difference from the information above.

I have noticed some regional variations in some parts of America. These seem to be related to the number of competing M&A Advisory firms in the local area.

I hope that’s helpful,

Basil

Reply

James E. Nash January 4, 2013 at 4:11 pm

The above Advisor Work Fees assumes a properly constructed Business Plan and Budgets are in place as well as Accounting Systems and all share registry and other secretarial files are up to date including Board and members meeting minutes, all Compliance work including; taxation, returns and Capital Gains records; other regulatory corporate returns are up to date and available for review.

On top of this specialist taxation (CGT) advise to affect restructure in a manner that protects the value of the owners’ and early investors’ interests is required.

The correcting of these issues is expensive (requiring a multi-disaplinary team) and often attracts fines and penalties

James E. Nash
IVM Network (Australia) Pty Ltd

Reply

Basil Peters January 9, 2013 at 8:59 am

Excellent point, James.

Yes, the M&A Advisory fees above do NOT include the work required to:

- write the business description, or
- build the financial model, or
- clean up the corporate structure and compliance, or
- analyze the tax

The legal work is also not included, of course.

You are correct that these items can add expense and delay. In some cases, they can even jeopardize the transaction.

Thanks for your excellent comment.

Basil

Reply

From LinkedIn January 25, 2013 at 10:51 am

Gregory Dupuis:

The APMAA has conducted blind survey’s on fee structure before. Generally, individual advisors are reluctant to discuss fees for many reason; not the least of which it could be considered collusion or price fixing tin he U.S.

Reply

Basil Peters January 25, 2013 at 10:57 am

Good point, Gregory. I hadn’t considered the issue of price fixing. Do you know if the results of the APMAA survey are available?

Reply

From LinkedIn January 26, 2013 at 2:32 pm

H Winston Hines, CBI, BiC

Gentlemen (and Ladies) of course we have to be cognizant of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act; however, there are just so many structures for compensation that I think that is what Basil was going for not a fixed fee opinion, but a survey of methods of compensation and a discussion of them…by the way the article is very good and thank you!

Reply

Basil Peters January 26, 2013 at 2:34 pm

Winston – thanks for the positive feedback!

Reply

Mike Barat February 6, 2013 at 3:36 pm

I am a former CEO that has been asked by a profitable $600 million company to work on retainer to find them several $20 to $100M businesses to acquire. The idea is that I would run these companies once they were acquired. This acquisitions would be financed by a large PE group who is a investor in the parent company. What range of retainer should be expected? Should I expect a success fee? And if so how much?

Reply

Basil Peters February 16, 2013 at 11:19 am

Excellent question, Mike. Because you might end up running the business you’d acquire, I don’t think you should expect a success fee on the transaction. If it was my money that was financing the acquisition, I would want to see you with a fair and equitable amount of equity in the business post-transaction. IMO your upside should become liquid on the sale of that business, not the purchase.

Reply

Jin Lee February 26, 2013 at 3:30 pm

Thank you for a great post. Do you also happen to know average success rate and closing period (in months) of deals sized between 10 to 100 million dollars? Thanks a million!

Reply

Basil Peters March 1, 2013 at 9:31 am

Excellent questions, Jin.

I have been gathering data on success rate for many years. I used to think the average success rate for M&A Advisors was in the 50 to 66% range. As I got more data, I realized that it is closer to 33%. Yes, that is difficult to believe.

Closing period varies from 6 to 18 months, mostly depending on how ready the company is. My previous record from first contact to money in the bank was 3 months. I helped to close a transaction late last year that was only 63 days. Deals are definitely closing faster.

Reply

From LinkedIn May 13, 2013 at 3:29 pm

Good article, you are right we should talk more openly about this, especially why selling small deals can be so expensive. thanks, Ken
By Ken Kinkel

Reply

From LinkedIn May 13, 2013 at 3:32 pm

Luis Alberto Figueiredo de Sousa

Excellent indication. I agree with you, an open discussion is good for both advisors and sellers.

Reply

Basil Peters May 13, 2013 at 3:33 pm

Ken and Luis,

Thanks for your encouragement and support.

Reply

Evgen May 16, 2013 at 1:55 am

Dear Basil,
Your range stops on 100 million so could you kindly advise on what would be the estimated M&A advisor fees for selling a business worth around $400-$500 mln? As I understand from few studies in internet it has to be approximately 1%, isn’t it?

Reply

Basil Peters June 12, 2013 at 4:02 pm

Evgen – When the transaction size gets that large, there will be a considerable amount of negotiation on the fees. It will also depend on how much work is involved in preparing the company. You are in the right range – I’d expect something in the $5 to 10 million range.

Reply

Derek Dalsin June 11, 2013 at 1:11 pm

Within the Canadian context I have seen vendor advisor contracts that upon success the work fee is converted to a prepayment of the success fee, a deposit as you will.

A distinction is drawn whether the sale is of assets or shares of the target.

An asset sale will draw a GST liability. Whereas a successful share sale will be a financial transaction exempt from GST in Canada.

Shareholders/vendors, if individuals, cannot claim input tax credits to recover the GST. Therefore if the work fee is converted under contract to a prepayment of success fee a savings can be achieved.

Careful attention to vendor contract terms can yield transaction savings.

Reply

Basil Peters June 12, 2013 at 4:06 pm

Good point on the GST, Derek. In an asset sale, the applicability of GST depends on the specific tax characteristics of the assets and the “Purchase Price Allocation”. We are seeing a lot more asset sales in cross-border transactions as a result of the new rapid depreciation rules in the US.

Reply

Andrew August 7, 2013 at 4:50 pm

Great article Basil! I am looking at structuring an engagement fee with a mid size firm targeting an initial small acquistion (approx 5m) and the model proposed is the typical upfront assessment fee, monthly retainer and ultimate success fee. I’ve already identified the target, completed an inital assessement and am very familiar with the industry segment. What I need is someone to undertake a review and ensure there are no missing pieces. How would you suggested altering the standard fee model?

Also assuming we stick with the traditional upfront, retainer and success fee model – would the upfront and retainer fee be deducted from the success fee or in addition to?

Appreciate the feedback
Andrew

Reply

Basil Peters August 13, 2013 at 3:10 pm

Thanks Andrew,

Assuming the upfront and success fee are in the standard ranges, then most of the time, you’d pay the person who came in to do the review. That type of expense is primary reason there are upfront fees – to cover your out of pocket expenses.

I believe the upfront and retainer fees should be deducted from the success fee – but lately, in this hot market, I have been noticing some firms quoting them as nondeductible. The important thing for both the firm and the clients is to be absolutely clear.

Good luck with the engagement!

Reply

Bryan August 15, 2013 at 4:01 pm

Basil,

Very good article. I have been involved in several different size acquisitions/divestitures in my management career. Your ranges are spot on from my experience in the US and Europe. Usually, the fees are proposed much higher but after some negotiating and wrangling, they consistently seem to end up within the ballpark of those mentioned in your article.

I have been approached by a family business to join their firm and prep their finance and operations groups for a sale of the business. The company has been growing rapidly and is managed by “home grown” talent with no experience in any of the prerequisites which would need to be in place for a buyer to be comfortable (strategic plan, ERP system, best practices, internal controls, treasury management, job descriptions, employee handbook, risk management, etc.). They have been very successful but very loosely run so they could probably be much more profitable than they currently are. Rough exit price is probably around $50-75MM in 12 months time at potentially a 6x EBITDA multiple. Have you seen situations where an in-house C-level executive is paid a success fee on exit? If so, what has that looked like in your experience? It seems like that would align both the executive’s goals with the owner’s goals. What are your thoughts?

Thanks for any insights and thanks for opening a great discussion on this topic.

All the best,
Bryan

Reply

Basil Peters August 16, 2013 at 7:10 am

Bryan,

Thanks very much for your input.

The situation you describe is very familiar – especially today as the boomer generation prepares to retire.

The most common method to do this is to structure an equity, or pseudo-equity, element in your contract.

Depending on the corporate and tax laws in your location, it may not be necessary to actually alter the share register to accomplish this. A contract to pay you a fixed percentage at the time of a liquidity event should be just as effective.

The challenge, of course, is to agree on a percentage. If you can actually increase the fundamental value as you suggest, and exit about a year from now, then I think something in the range of 2 to 3% is not unreasonable. This is based on my understanding that you will increase the sales price by 10 to 20% by executing on your operational changes above.

I hope this helps. Good luck with your negotiations and the exit!

Basil

Reply

Justin Floyd November 19, 2013 at 2:40 pm

Very good article and on point. We see it all and have evolved from smaller deals in the $5M range to more lower to mid-market. Our structure always incorporates a min advisory or work fee and in some cases a min fee.

Justin C. Floyd

Managing Director
JCF Capital Advisors, LLC

Website: http://www.jcfcapitaladvisors.com
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/justin-floyd/1/80b/35b

Reply

Michael Cooper November 30, 2013 at 9:24 am

Great insight Basil.

In building our database of private companies that have been sold to public strategic acquirers we have developed data on transaction fees, legal, accounting and valuation fees of several hundred of the transactions. The range of fees paid is surprising. If anyone is interested in this data, please contact us.

If your mid size business owners are looking for top prices paid for private companies and who is buying whom, then visit http://www.Private2IPO.com which provides data and names on recent sales of private companies.

Reply

Basil Peters December 11, 2013 at 1:53 pm

Thanks. I’m interested in your data and have signed up for a trial. I look forward to learning more.

Reply

Basil Peters December 11, 2013 at 1:57 pm

Mel,

Thanks for your positive feedback.

Your website looks interesting.

I’ll let you know when I am next in London.

Basil

Reply

Mark Farber February 5, 2014 at 3:45 pm

Hi Basil,

How does the success fee work (from the sell-side advisory point of view), if the purchase price is being paid in private stock of the buyer? I want to pay the advisor in the same currency I am getting for the company (i.e. won’t have the cash to pay the fee if I sell for private stock). How do I pay my advisor in stock of options in a way that provides the full value of the fee to my advisor without triggering a tax for him b4 he is able to liquidate for cash?

Mark

Reply

Basil Peters February 6, 2014 at 11:01 am

Excellent question, Mark.

Not all M&A Advisors will agree, but I believe your advisor should be paid in the same form, and with the same timing as the shareholders. In part for the point you make about cash, but also because it maximizes alignment between the shareholders and the advisor.

Your point on tax is not as easy to answer. I’ve seen a few innovative tax strategies used to defer the tax but they were situation, and jurisdiction, dependent.

Reply

Mark Farber February 7, 2014 at 2:32 pm

Thanks Basil. Agree with you on aligning objectives. Just struggling with the tax issue. Unfair for him to have to pay taxes on private stock for successfully helping us with a transaction and then have the risk of being underwater for providing a valuable service.

Reply

Eric Bots-Bjerre February 6, 2014 at 7:18 am

I think this is a very interesting discussion. The fees you mention seem to be on the high side for Europe. I believe in situations where the advisor has a clear edge (not just a good reputation or network) they might be reached.

Success fee schemes where the percentage increases if the sales value becomes higher are often suggested. I used this both while I still worked at a large investment bank as in my current practice at B2CF. Although I firmly believe that such schemes are the right way to go to push your advisor to go the extra mile, the problem for many clients is that they sometimes feel that if the price ends up above the high thresholds that this is not the work of the advisor but just general market movement or a wrong initial assessment and when the fees become very large this becomes difficult to swallow when they see it on paper.

One additional element to fee levels is whether a longer term relationship exists or can be created. By using the same advisor you might save the advisor some marketing cost and/or time getting familiar with your company’s situation. Good advisors will value such relationship and will be willing to quote sharper prices.

Finally, some key elements determining pricing are:
- Type and reputation of buyer
- Has the Seller received many approaches from potential buyers
- Attractiveness of the asset
- Has the company been for sale before

Reply

Basil Peters February 6, 2014 at 11:06 am

Eric, thanks for contributing your perspective on success fees in Europe.

I agree with your point about formulas where the success fee percentage increases above a certain valuation. The intention has merit, but the implementation is fraught with problems. Just one reason is the one you mention – price change from the start of the engagement to the exit that is not the result of the M&A Advisor’s work. Market changes can affect prices, but also how would the shareholders feel if management did something to significantly increase the value post engagement. Would it be fair to enrich the M&A Advisor in that situation?

Reply

Professional Accountants and Taxation advisors March 23, 2014 at 10:08 pm

Great discussion here. I am learning a lot! Thanks for this post, Basil.

Reply

mark July 30, 2014 at 4:48 pm

I have a related question. I am selling my company now and a friend introduced me to an investment bank that he knew was purchasing assets in my industry. He insists on not taking any compensation for the “favor” but it got the deal done in record time for roughly $10m
Is there an industry standard or range for introducing deals or finders fee that I can compensate him?
thanks in advance!

Reply

Basil Peters July 31, 2014 at 10:27 am

Excellent question, Mark. Congratulations on getting the deal done!

In the M&A industry, there are reasonably consistent ranges paid by one advisory firm to another for introductions that lead to a completed transaction. They are usually calculated as a percentage of the success fees. So that’s not a very helpful way to answer your question.

In your case, it’s difficult for me to be more specific because I don’t know the details of your transaction. My rough suggestion is somewhere in the 0.5% to 1% of the transaction range – around $50,000 to $100,000. I hope that’s helpful.

Reply

Ben September 30, 2014 at 8:56 pm

Is the buyer or the seller that pays the success fee as my business was contacted by a M & A company that is working with an investor looking buy profitable companies in Edmonton, Canada

Reply

Basil Peters October 7, 2014 at 11:21 am

Ben, the seller pays the M&A advisor.

The buyer may also have a “buy-side” M&A advisor working for them and the buyer pays for that.

Reply

Leave a Comment

{ 2 trackbacks }

Previous post:

Next post: